The Repetitive Nature of Training Is *Not* Killing Me

fractal

Subtitle: Krav Homework Sucks a Lot Less Than Trigonometry

There’s a very important but sometimes neglected concept in learning self-defense. Really, it applies to developing any new skill, be it Krav Maga, playing piano, or knitting. It’s practice, or as we like to refer to it to make it sound more intense: training.

Krav Maga as a system is designed to quickly build proficiency in students and provide them with tools that remain effective under stress and/or from a position of disadvantage that will neutralize a threat and keep them safe.

[Read more...]

Share

Developing Your “When”

krav_countdown
One concept that sets Krav Maga apart from most other self-defense systems is that we consistently train from a position of disadvantage. The belief is that all techniques must work whether we are prepared or not, as most situations requiring us to defend ourselves occur suddenly and with little warning. If we only trained from a prepared position (our fighting stance), we would either be delayed to action or—much worse—freeze when caught off guard.

Part of our training involves practicing both offensive and defensive techniques from what we call passive or neutral position. Beyond developing lighting-fast reaction, not much forethought must go into defensive techniques; the decision to act has been made for us by the attacker. Launching a preemptive assault, however, is a very different situation. We must consider the how?, the when?, and the what then? (the immediate and longer-term consequences) of such an action.

[Read more...]

Share